Lawton House (Roselawn)
(Lawton House) Roselawn stands out not only as an example of early nineteenth century architecture,
but also as a plantation that has been maintained and farmed continuously by one family throughout its
entire history. Roselawn is one of the few plantations of the Buddenville area that was not destroyed
during the Civil War. Lawton Family tradition hold that Union General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick camped at
Roselawn while in the area. Roselawn is a pine-clapboard, one and one-half story raised cottage built by
Joseph Alexander Lawton. The home was begun ca. 1835 and completed ca. 1840 and it has remained
in the Lawton family throughout its entire history. It is a classic example of the raised cottage style of
architecture. Three dormer windows and a piazza, which extends its entire length, characterize the
front façade. Originally the piazza extended halfway down each side of the structure but through the
years most of it has been enclosed. The rear piazza has also been partially enclosed on each side. Brick
pillars, nine feet high, support the piazzas. A broken gable roof covers the structure. The original
shingle roof was covered by tin ca 1900. Two of the three single brick chimneys were destroyed by
tornadoes in 1960 but were reconstructed as close in style to the originals as possible. The floor plan is
basically rectangular. There are four rooms in the basement, none on the main floor, with a central hall,
and two rooms connected by a small landing on the upper floor. It is adequately and exquisitely
furnished in original furniture. Listed in the National Register May 28, 1976.